February 17, 2012

Beetroot Soup & Little Pies

February 17, 2012
Awhile ago my husband, who doesn’t usually care for soups, fell sick with flu. He lost his ferocious appetite and for days desired only soups. It gave me a rare opportunity to experiment in the kitchen. This beetroot soup is one of the better ones I came up with. And, oh, it goes so well with lovely broccoli and cheese pies.

We eat beetroots often. They are colourful and fun vegetables. I rarely boil them, but usually roast them in the oven or on a frying pan. Roasting condenses the texture and intensifies the sweetness by lending a toffee-like edge. Boiled beetroots taste rounder and milder.

I’ve made the soup twice with the same ingredients but different methods. First time I roasted raw beetroots, potatoes and spices in the oven and added sundried tomatoes to the liquid (whey) with them. The taste was perfectly sweet and sour, and there was something to chew, too.

The second time I fried raw potatoes and spices on a pan, and added sundried tomatoes and boiled beetroots half way through. When the potatoes were nicely browned, I added the liquid. The taste was richer and softer.
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Cheese and broccoli filling for pies, samosas, is excellent when you don’t have time or energy to cut vegetables. With a few chops it is done. Whenever I make more than 30 samosas, I prefer this recipe. I’m yet to find someone who doesn’t like the taste. Sometimes Westerners find Indian style samosas with mixed vegetables or dal too exotic. A concept of lightly spiced cheese and broccoli is easier to relate to. It is similar but less tangy than cheese and spinach.


When baking at home, I use only wholegrain flour. It makes samosas a bit rougher. I often add rye flour, too. It gives a pleasant, smoky flavour. For crisp and flaky pastries, nothing beats refined flour and deep frying! It is the way I would serve samosas to special guests. If you come and visit, I will have a subject for another blog-entry! Until then, mixed flour samosas in the oven it is!
1-Samosa2-Samosa3-Samosa4-Samosa
Thank you.

48 comments:

  1. thank you this looks fab!

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  2. Love your pictures, spicy colors

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  3. I don't eat beet often. But I really love roasted beets. I wonder why id on't eat them often enough....
    Beautiful photos once again Lakshmi :)

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  4. A wonderful soup and great pies! Your clicks are so beautiful.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  5. love that the samosas are baked, beetroot & flour images are beautiful

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  6. That soup looks so comforting and delicious. How interesting that you used whey in the soup. I've never heard of this before. And those little broccoli and cheese samosa's look amazing.

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  7. These pictures are soo nice and the pies look amazing!!! Can't wait to try this! Thanks! Have a wonderful day! marghe@lechatdesucre.com

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  8. I like how you show things like making samosa covers so well! Ingenious. Inspiring.

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  9. Couldn't guess it's beetroot soup, since these beets have this overpowering red-purple color! The soup looks great, is it all the herbs I see floating!
    Haven't had samoasas with broccoli-paneer filling, sounds interesting. What's that white sauce dripped on the samosa?
    Gorgeous pictures :)

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  10. Such a good time for beets! I just posted a beet risotto with celeriac on my blog that you might want to check out. I'm definitely going to have to try this soup! Thank you so much for the idea.

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  11. So good to see you back XX

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  12. Wish I could eat your pictures :-)I love beets fried and in salads. Never tried them in a soup before. This looks too good

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  13. So good to see you back :) I was expecting a pink color soup and here you are sharing such a rich golden color soup. And that's a very interesting take on samosa.

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  14. Laksmi, you should try sour beetroots (like sour picled cucumber) they are very good for beetroots soups. Also if you want the soup to keep pink color (but I think your one has even nicer color)it is good to add some beetroot juice on the end and do not boil it (boilig kills pink color of beetroots). Sometimes it is just good enough to add only few slices of fresh beetroot to the soup on the end of cooking and simmer it (not boil over) for 2-3 minuts. Greetings from BURAK's country- love Cintamani

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  15. Add some cabbage and you got yourself proper Russian borsch :). Seriously, borsch has beets, potatoes, tomatoes and some lemon juice for tartness. Plus carrots and cabbage. Most people prefer to eat it with sour cream.

    You have a gorgeous blog, Laksmi, I use it as an inspiration. Thank you!

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  16. Lovely photos and thanks for the diagrams on folding samosas. Too cute :)

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  17. My first samosas were in Oxford England and, to be honest, I haven't had one that's compared to it. These look incredible though!

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  18. Thank you for visiting!

    I wanted the soup to be a simple winter vegetable soup with herbs, rather than a pinkish borsch. The colour was reddish, like in the picture with a ladle. I successfully managed to cover it by adding sour cream & olive oil on the top :-). Thus the rest of pictures show warm yellowish hue.

    Nisha – yes, there are herbs on the top. It is sour-cream on the samosas.

    Madhu – ♥

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  19. sembra una vera delizia! complimenti :) un bacio!

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  20. Well, anyway, that photo of the soup in the ladle made me think it looks exactly like the borsch from my home country :).

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  21. Alina, you are right. If I remember correctly, there are two kinds of borsch; hot and cold. The cold one has a strong pink/purple color, which I wanted to avoid! The warm one is reddish and less scary :-). Nothing beats a good Russian borsch! Do you have a recipe on your blog?

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  22. The samosas are delightful and seem to pair beautifully with this gorgeous soup...lovely flavors!

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  23. Lovely appetizing samosas. The photos are fantastic as always. Beet soup is something I haven't tried before. Seems I have been missing out on a delightful, hearty soup.

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  24. Intoxicating photos! What a lovely winter meal to share with a special someone who is feeling under the weather.

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  25. Cheese and broccoli, why have i never thought of that combination as a pie filling! This is gorgeous and i'm in love with your blog.

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  26. Thank you for adding the conversions! I was just sharing your site with someone last night. ;)

    Blessings-
    Tiffany

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  27. first time here and totally in love with the space ...................it is beautiful !! just got here but had to pen in my first impressions :)

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  28. Beautiful! missed your posts Lakshmi..
    Rye flour for samosas - lovely food for thought.. :)

    Love your unique take on things, always..

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  29. I'm so happy that you're back! I hope you had a nice blogging-free time.

    I've never had a beet before but this looks interesting.

    I'm the same as you when it comes to baking with whole grain flour. Only guests and birthday people get baked goods with white flour.

    Lovely pictures as always. :)

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  30. I have always wanted to learn how to make samosas. Thank you for the mini folding tutorial! Very helpful. Stunning photography. Glad you are getting more daylight! Feel the same way living in Prague.

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  31. Thank you, all of you, for stopping by and leaving a comment.

    Erin, nice to "see" you, too.

    Sarah, there are many ways to fold samosas. This method was easiest to illustrate :-). It is the simplest way. If you use refined flour alone, you won't fail. Wholegrain has more personality and is trickier to handle.

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  32. I am so happy to see your post again, it makes my day. You always leave me wanting more, no pressure!

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  33. Laksmi - I blog in Russian, and usually about the food from the States where I now live. My Russian audience finds it more interesting... If I do decide to blog in English, I will perhaps focus on the Russian food instead. I've been thinking about that actually.

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  34. I love love your samosa folding tutorial. Glad to have you back.

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  35. I am usually not a huge beet fan, but recently I was having some beet craving. I think I will give this soup a try :-)

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  36. I just discovered your blog and am amazed by all the lovely pictures. Thank you so much! And now I just have to make those beautiful samosas.

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  37. Beautiful!!!!
    I love ur soup and samosa folding tutorial...
    Missed you..

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  38. Your photos are lovely as always. I especially adore that sack of flours shot! Gorgeous! And what a combination of flavors.

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  39. Oh the delight of my day is back :) missed your posts for so long and am glad to be soaking my calm afternoon in with your recipes and photographs. What a cute way to show the samosa folding.

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  40. wow - your soup looks delish, but your photos are drool worthy!

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  41. Such a pretty post & that soup looks amazing!

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  42. Not only is beetroot great for boosting stamina and making muscles work harder, it also contains potassium, magnesium and iron as well as vitamin A.

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  43. 2013. It is going to be a great year! Last night I made this soup and the samosa's, while playing some amazing music from "THE VIOLIN TRIO", Ragam Tanam Pallavi... So much pleasure in your pictures and in the process of cooking such a lovely meal! Thanks for all that you share!

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    1. Nanette, thank you! I also think 2013 will be a great year. All the best to you!

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