March 25, 2012

Shrikhand

March 25, 2012
As a yogurt based dish, shrikhand is an ideal summertime dessert. However, being exquisite and simple to make, it is irresistible all around the year. Fresh, homemade yogurt yields the best result.
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Flavoured with saffron and cardamom, yogurt is drained overnight in a cloth bundle. It turns into a thick, silky sweetness when powder-sugar is added.
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Shrikhand has a refined taste. It marries well with fresh berries during the season. Combined with mango, it is called amrakhand.
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Because of the perfection of aromas I associate shrikhand with aristocracy. Whether served on a silver plate in a posh reception or on leaf cup in a humble hut, it tastes unadulterated. It is pure and natural.
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Thank you.

40 comments:

  1. Ha, I made this last week and I have the recipe in my draft :) It's the perfect treat for springtime, simple, healthy and delicious too. Gorgeous photos, as usual!

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  2. I make this on Gudhi Padwa ( new year - mar 23, this year) every year. In fact, shrikhand puri is a tradition on Padwa amongst Maharashtrians.
    I love how creamy it is! Bliss:)

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  3. This certainly looks delicious! And so amazingly creamy. I've never had this but I'm interested in trying it (but without the saffron). I need to find out some more about making homemade yogurt. It sounds like it would be worth the effort.

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  4. Yummy!! I love srikhand and need to make it soon, thanks for sharing :)

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  5. I didn't know this recipe but I'm sure I will become a big fan of it. I'll try. Thanks as always for your special world :-)

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  6. I have never heard of this before but it looks lovely...the best way to eat yogurt I've seen in a while. I can't wait to try it!

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  7. Lakshmi you are such a master at what you do. I'm loving the yellow and grey color palette here. I have recenty been introduced to the joys of shrikhand and I absoluetly love it.

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  8. Shrikhand looks very delicious... I wanted to make this with starwberries... will be posting that soon!

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  9. I make mines almost the same, except straining. I guess it's not shrikhand then, but that was what my friend and fellow blogger taught when came back from India.

    Yet, the flavors are stunning and you're so right about the aristocracy of this dish. Th e colors, taste and everything about this favorite breakfast indulgence speaks royalty to me.

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  10. Arvind LOVES Srikhand. It's always there at home .. specially during summer. I never tried making my own version... Will have to try as soon as I get some juicy mangoes :)

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  11. i love love shrikhand and make it all year round. Lakshmi, the colors palette here is so pure and soothing, just like shrikhand!

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  12. Divine looking! A fabulous dessert.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  13. This looks so good and I'm certainly going to make this.
    Thank you.
    Hugs, Pauline

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  14. One of the simple joys of life! I have had many versions of Shrikhand (pistachio, almond, fig, mango, strawberry, and even vanilla) but the simple saffron infused with heady cardamom still retains the top position :) A spoonful into your mouth and you are left floating among the puffy white clouds! :D

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  15. This look sooo delicious! Can't believe it is basicely just yoghurt!

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  16. That's beautiful, Lakshmi, thanks for sharing your beautiful shots and recipes!
    I have never heard of such a dessert, it really appeals me though!
    The ingredients are so simple, looks also easy to do too!
    Do you think it works with diary free yoghurt? (soyamilk alternatives I mean)
    Thanks

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  17. Thank you for visiting & dropping a comment.

    Roberta - technically, yes, it should work with soyayogurt (or similar). However, be warned, there is a couple of universes difference in taste. A high quality yogurt is the point of the recipe. Saffron and cardamom round it up. Somehow I have a feeling that the rich, velvet-like softness and refinement are lost with dairy alternatives. If you are used to dairy-free products, it may not taste that bad. But I can't promise a successful result. If you try it, please let us know.

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  18. I make homemade yogurth and I'll try this, thanks for sharing

    iosoiki

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  19. Love Srikhand! You have described it so well - aristocracy it is.. especially when paired with luscious juicy mangoes, it is difficult to exercise portion control..

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  20. Lakshimi... You have made my favorite dessert...
    You know my Dad say Srikhand is like a piece of heaven for us human... LOL
    We all love it in our family, I really don't enjoy the ready made one's we get in super markets...
    I will make this soon...

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  21. This is very similar to a traditional Dutch dish called "hangop", but without the addition of saffron of course. Love this and such gorgeous pictures!

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  22. Question: How much does this yield approx? You start with 4 cups, but end up with...
    Also, does cheese cloth work just fine?

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  23. Thank you.

    Amy - You can drain it until half of the volume is gone. You will have 2 Cups left. Sometimes I drain it longer. The yogurt becomes more condensed but also sour. Adjust the amount of sugar accordingly. 2 cups serves 4-6 persons with a normal appetite, or 2 persons, like in our family :-).

    If you mean a thin cotton by cheesecloth, it is perfect. I use it myself. Anything that is fine enough but allows the whey to go through is good.

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  24. yummy :) practing making good recipes. Thank u for help =) following you :), hope u visit me some time.

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  25. This sounds divine, I know what ill be trying out next weekend!

    Zoe
    http://gypsiesister.blogspot.com

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  26. Only you Lakshmi can is capable of bringing out the feel of the taste in photographs. Elegant, delicate, aristrocratic - all defines your photos and the srikhand. I make this all year, but it tastes the best in summer when the heat comes down on us. The way to have this is to savor every lick... even licking off the back of the spoon clean.

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  27. any suggestions for drinking the whey? good source of protein - just swig it down?

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  28. Thank you!

    B - I've seen commercial juice products with whey added. I suppose it would mix well in smoothies. I'm using it in cooking: as a stock for bakings, vegetables or rice.

    Whey from draining yogurt is very sour. Cheesemaking produces less sour whey.

    The good news for those who have excess whey all the time, garden plants like it!

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  29. hi lakshmi. first time to your blog. i must say great design and awesome photographs.

    shrikhand never looked so beautiful to me before.....

    i have liked your posts and pics so much that i am subscribing to you and even adding you on my facebook page.

    i am a great lover of the hare krishna tradition. have visited most of the hare krishna temples in india. my favorite being the vrindavan and mumbai iskcon temples.

    just loved your blog :-)

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  30. Thank you Dassana! Nice to meet you. Did you know that besides the Juhu temple, there is a small but lovely Radha-Gopinath Mandir in Chowpatti, Mumbai. Next time you are around, please visit there. There is something exceptional about the mood. It is as close as it gets to Vrindavan outside of Vraja :-).

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  31. next time i visit mumbai, i will make it a point to go to the radhi-gopinath mandir in chowpatti :-)

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  32. Hi Lakshmi, I'm very curious about this recipe. I wonder if you're using cardamom powder of some sort? I have the cardamom seeds, do you have any suggestions on how to incorporate this? Thanks so much in advance.

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  33. If you have green cardamoms, peel them and powder the little black seeds. If they are fresh and strong, use less than the recipe calls.

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  34. wow, Lakshmi. your photos are so beautiful and yet, reveal your modesty, too. all very simple and wholesome. i think only you could take something like srikand and make it look as delicious as it does. utterly lovely. x s

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  35. S- thanks :-) You have a lovely blog!

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  36. I love the table you've used here. Yes and the Srikand looks creamy, more like an ice cream :)

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  37. Pratiba, "the table" is made of thin planks IKEA uses for packing and transporting their goods! I just nailed them together, threw some paint and plaster on the top and scratched the surface.

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  38. A relative once introduced me to shrikhand by adding cardamon and sugar to store-bought, smooth cottage cheese. However, I've just tried your recipe today and using yogurt produces an even more delightful result!

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    Replies
    1. Nicole, nice to hear! Shrikhand is a fabulous dessert.

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  39. The post is written in very a good manner and it entails many useful information for me.

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