January 21, 2015

Buckwheat Roti

January 21, 2015
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One cup buckwheat flour, a good pinch of Himalayan salt, one tablespoon of ghee (or oil), and about a third of a cup water (or as much as needed for an elastic dough) – that’s the basic recipe for making buckwheat flatbread, or roti. For softer dough, use dairy – milk, yogurt or buttermilk – rather than water. Being gluten free, buckwheat doesn’t have viscosity and tends to dry up and tear apart easily. Dairy functions as glue.
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Rub the ghee into the flour and salt mixture with your fingertips until it resembles coarse crumbs. Fold in the liquid gradually. If you slip in too much water, add flour. There is no need to excessively knead the dough. As soon as you have formed a smooth ball, cover it and let it rest at least for thirty minutes.
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Should you become an adventurous baker, incorporate mashed avocado to the flour mixture. Reduce the amount of water accordingly.
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Potatoes and buckwheat go well together. Make spicy roti by adding ground jeera and black pepper, chilli, and fresh fenugreek seedlings or chopped cilantro along with the potatoes.
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The stovetop baking method is straightforward. If you want fully blown, feather light breads you need two sources of heat.

First, place the flatbread on a medium hot skillet (preferably cast iron) and let it bake until tiny bubbles appear on the top and the edges curl. If you roll the bread thinly, it takes only about thirty to sixty seconds, but if you make a thicker bread, it may take one and half to two minutes to reach this point. Using metal tongs, lift the bread and place it on the top of a direct flame. It should instantly fill with hot air. If you don’t have access to fire, place a mesh a few centimeters (1 inch) above a hot burner and flip the bread over it. As soon as it puffs, remove and cover it with a cloth.

I usually skip the second part and bake the bread on a skillet by flipping it over continuously while tenderly pressing and encouraging it to cook properly. At some point I brush a little bit ghee on the top. With this method, the bread formulates many smaller air pockets instead of becoming like a balloon.

Happy baking!
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Thank you.





21 comments :

  1. O, God, your pictures are gorgeous!

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  2. :-). They are taken in two different times, locations and light conditions - can you tell the difference?

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  3. These pictures are gorgeous and I so appreciate the recipe. YUM. Because you commented on the last posted comment, I will answer yes. I can see the difference in the lighting. Dena@Gathering Flavors

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  4. Gorgeous pictures!! so lovely lighting...

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  5. I have never used buckwheat flour before, got a bag out of curiosity the other day. Also I have some Avocado already, thank you for the timely recipe. Will let you know how that goes.

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  6. OMG these pictures are so, so beautiful.
    Thank you as always for sharing your knowledge and talent.
    Such a beautiful blog!

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  7. Lovely ! Will certainly bake them soon, thank you once again.

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  8. Long time Lakshmi...... Nice post and as usual you did it. Great photographs. Very well captured

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  9. If only I had your patience and grace in the kitchen. Looks so beautiful and delicious I will make an attempt. Wish me luck!

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  10. Very beautiful blog ! I am definitely going to try this. :)

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  11. OMG, that picture of the coal-fired stove is gorgeous. Do you own it? Where did you get it from?

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    Replies
    1. This wood stove is in my brother's house. I have a similar but smaller one at home. Nowadays I only cook on wood, I don't have electricity or gas in the kitchen.

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  12. This looks sooo good. I am ready to try out your recipe today. Thanks for sharing the beautiful pictures.

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  13. Thank you for sharing your passion with us. In your pictures I saw life. I will make this recipe this afternoon, March 10, 2016, with the love I felt transpire for your blog and I will also subscribe to it. Blessings.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words. I hope you liked the rotis!

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  14. AnonymousMay 12, 2016

    How much potato would you suggest using?

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    1. Maybe half a cup of mashed potatoes for every one cup of flour? Or a bit less? You'll have to experiment because I haven't done these for awhile.

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    2. I would think you can use more potatoes with wheat flour, or any flour with gluten. Buckwheat flour makes a crumbly dough, which is more difficult to roll out. Buckwheat rotis don't puff as readily as wheat ones either.

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  15. Great recipe. Will have a go;) nice style;)

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  16. Also another ingredient that works as a binding agent is ground flax or chia seed mixed with water (3 parts flax 1 part water)

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